Connecting to LinkedIn...

W1siziisimnvbxbpbgvkx3rozw1lx2fzc2v0cy9mdxr1cmutywn0axzll2pwzy9zdwitymfubmvylwrlzmf1bhquanbnil1d

Blog

How much are you worth?

Posted on 6/07/2018 by Gemma Dwyer

Blank

 

From exploring the topic of teachers wages, I have found out some key infomation; some stating the positives of a teacher and some negative. Arguing for both sides, we will end up with a result whether the factors balance each other out or if one outweighs the other. 

Wages of a teacher can differentiate between areas of the country. Inner London salaries start of at a minimum of £22,917 to £28,660 for newly qualified teachers (NQTs) (That are employed in a teaching role within six months of completing their training). To earn as much as £116,738 for the role of a headteacher. However, in outer areas such as the London fringe you would be looking to earn as much as £26,000 for average teachers and up to £100,448 if in the role of a headteacher. Whilst the average pay for a High School Teacher is £27,797 per year, some are undoubtably paid much lower, in fact teaching assistants earn around £12,134 on average a year in 2017, which is the rate of poverty. School academies now have more freedom to develop their own pay policies to attract and retain the teachers. Therefore, teachers are not viewed on length of service to the school and career but will be paid based on the pupils’ results in education, suggesting you can increase your salary ‘faster than ever before’. This is done by having more people in the class reaching their targets or over achieving, giving the teacher extra points for an increased bonus at the end of the school year.

Below show the accurate data for 2017 wages as a teacher

Salary ranges:

To find out more about your actual salary click on the areas below

 

England and Wales
(excluding London and fringes)

Inner London

Outer London

London fringe

Headteachers

Max

£109,366

£116,738

£112,460

£110,448

Min

£44,544

£51,991

£47,667

£45,633

Leading practitioners

Max

£59,857

£67,305

£62,985

£60,945

Min

£39,374

£46,814

£42,498

£40,458

Upper pay ranges

Max

£38,633

£47,298

£42,498

£39,725

Min

£35,927

£43,616

£39,519

£37,017

Main pay ranges

Max

£33,824

£39,006

£37,645

£34,934

Min

£22,917

£28,660

£26,662

£24,018

Unqualified teachers

Max

£26,295

£30,573

£29,422

£27,384

Min

£16,626

£20,909

£19,749

£17,718

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A claim quoting “teachers do not deserve a big pay rise because they have already seen "generous" salary increases”, has been labelled "complete nonsense" by education unions. The Taxpayers' Alliance argues that teachers should not receive a significant rise because their average salary for a leading practitioner is £38,400 a year, which is "considerably higher" than the UK average income of £28,600; Yet only the average pay for a High School Teacher is £27,797 per year.

Another growing topic is that teachers have only received a 1% pay rise each year up to 2017, the nation rate of inflation has been growing at the rate of 2%. Teachers pay rises have fallen behind inflation by 13 per cent since 2010 and therefore teachers are ending up worse off than when they started. So in theory their wages have been de valued. The latest pay announcement will mean that teachers will be given an expected wage increase of 15 per cent, however the date of this is unknown. A comment made from the NEU saying, “teachers’ pay should be subject to a substantial immediate increase from September 2018, which begins the process of restoring pay in both real and comparative terms”. This increase should start off with a 5 per cent pay increase for all teachers in post. which should be the start of a further process of restoration of teachers’ pay; or at least to the real terms levels prevailing in 2010. Upwards of 150,000 of the 197,000 teachers who applied for a £2,000 performance-related pay increase last year are expected to get it. The pay being offered to newly qualified teachers would be an increase of  £3,500 or higher, only being if the pay cap has not been applied. Also, there will be an increase of junior teaching wages of 6% which will target new younger people to give them the incentive to get into or stay in teaching. Recently wages have risen and are set to increase each year onwards. Still UCAC are still hoping for future increase in wages but at this point of time its not what they have hoped for.

From an outside persepctive i believe that qualified teachers should be given a pay rise because they have one of the most important jobs. Yes we say a doctors could save a life and police protect and serve the citizens. But overall if teachers did not exist then who would teach people these important jobs. however due to them being in the public sector they are funded my the goverment and therefore it may be hard to find extra capital to fund the increse in wages.

It starts with teachers. start teaching!

If you are interested in a career in teaching visit our careers page 

or if your looking for a job in teaching visit our home page to srach for your perfect job.

 

 

 

resourses

https://www.tes.com/jobs/careers-advice/pay-and-conditions/pay-scale-calculator

https://getintoteaching.education.gov.uk/funding-and-salary/teacher-salaries

https://www.teachers.org.uk/pay-pensions-conditions/pay